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Apple Pay Cash is Here, Is Your Small Business Ready?

 

Apple Pay Cash is Here -- Is Your Small Business Ready?

The arrival of iOS 11.2 Beta brings with it Apple Pay Cash. This will allow users to send and receive cash payments from the iPhone Messages app using iMessage. You will be able to send cash to another person as long as they also have the latest iOS Beta.

Apple Pay Cash is catching up with the likes of Venmo, Zelle and others with simplified peer-to-peer payment solutions. Although it is a bit late in the game, Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) doesn’t require a dedicated or special app for the transactions. It works through the Messages app, which comes with the iOS platform.

Why Apple Pay Cash?

According to Comscore, there were around 85.5 million iPhone users by the end of 2016 in the US. This number undoubtedly has increased since the introduction of the new iPhone 8 and X models. As a small business, freelancer or anyone else looking to make or receive payments, the availability of Apple Pay Cash will provide more options and increased access to customers.

Where Can You Use Apple Pay Cash?

Once you receive money with Apple Pay in Messages, you can use the money with Apple Pay Cash on the web, within apps, and in physical stores.

Apple said in its support page, “There’s no app to download, and you can use the cards you already have in Wallet. Send money for books to your son in college. Split a bill. Pay a babysitter. Send and receive from across the table — or across the country. Instantly.”

Setting Up Apple Pay Cash

If you have a supported device and OS, you have to sign in to iCloud with your Apple ID. Tap Settings and go to Wallet & Apple Pay. You then tap the Apple Pay Cash card and follow the onscreen instructions to use the funds someone has sent you, or send a payment of your own.

Availability

You can start using Apple Pay Cash with iOS public beta from the Apple Beta Software Program now. If you don’t want to try the beta, the full version of iOS 11.2 will be released for all iPhone users later this year, along with watchOS 4.2 for Apple Watch.

You also have to be at least 18 years old and live in the United States, have two-factor authentication for your Apple ID, and an eligible credit or debit card in Wallet. Apple doesn’t charge a fee for using Apple Pay Cash with a debit card, but if you use your credit card to send money, the standard three percent fee will apply.

Image: Apple

This article, “Apple Pay Cash is Here, Is Your Small Business Ready?” was first published on Small Business Trends

The Secret to a Successful Franchise? A ‘Community’-Based Business

 

The real challenge is finding the hook and putting the people in place to make it all possible.

 

Make Friends First and Pretend You’re Switzerland: 7 Tips for a Successful Business Partnership

 

Good relationships deliver 100 percent for each partner. Why not over-deliver?

 

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3 Lessons for Modern and Tenacious Leaders

 

The lines begin to blur

In 2015, when Ukrainian writer Svetlana Alexievich won the Nobel Prize for Literature, she was a genre buster. While other writers have captured political turmoil in gripping works of fiction, her work is devoted to real people’s stories. Her art isn’t literature, per se. It’s journalism.

Last year, another genre buster won the Nobel Prize for Literature: Bob Dylan. His win was a big surprise around the world. Not because his lyrics aren’t poetic, or even poetry for that matter, but because Nobel laureates are thought to be the ultimate leaders in their field, each one a divining rod for cultural transformation. So literature lovers everywhere were left wondering where these two nontraditional, non-literary choices might be leading us.

The answer? To uncharted territory. And whenever I find myself somewhere new without a map, I ask myself …

What’s the lesson?

That leadership can no longer embody the status quo.

Whether or not song lyrics and journalism qualify as literature isn’t the point. The point is that leadership is about embracing change. Constantly.

Whether you’re an artist, a scientist, a politician or a corporate executive, being a leader in today’s 24/7 culture requires flexibility, tenacity and a willingness to explore the unknown. This means that what got you where you are today won’t get you where you want to go.

Speaking of where you are today, chances are you’re a leader due to one of two scenarios:

  1. You were a superstar individual contributor, so, to engage you, you were promoted to manager. But you haven’t had much formal leadership training.
  2. You set out to be a leader and you’ve been managing people for years. The leadership development courses you’ve taken have been instrumental in your success.

But regardless of which leader you are – and even if you’re a senior executive – you have one thing in common: Your employees rely on you for coaching.

And as management trends move from command-and-control to servant leadership, from “telling” to coaching, tackling tough situations with aplomb is now more dynamic than static.

Here are three ways you can keep pace with change as you coach your team.

1. Feedback: The good, the bad and the ugly

A former boss of mine used to say that feedback was a gift – as long as she was the one giving it.

Kidding aside, effective feedback is essential to coaching like a pro, but it can be the trickiest aspect of the game.

Communicating negative messages toward a positive outcome takes practice and preparation. Remember to be timely with your feedback, but resist the temptation to lash out in the moment or to criticize in front of others. When you do coach on weak areas, heading out of the office for a change of scene can defuse some of the personal emotion.

Unsure about whether to involve HR in a sticky performance conversation? Ask. A good HR business partner will know from experience when they need to step in, and they can roleplay with you as part of your prep work.

On the flip side, be just as mindful of how you deliver positive strokes. If you decide to praise one employee verbally in front of others, make sure it isn’t creating another performance problem for you by alienating a different team member. If you’re praising an employee in writing, make sure you have all your facts straight.

Positive or negative, don’t put it off. Strike while the iron’s hot.

2. Growth: What goes around comes around

According to Gallup, the global employee engagement statistic is hovering at a shockingly low 13 percent. Providing career growth options to your team can hugely impact how much skin they have in the game. But it’s also hard work. So, why aren’t you spending more time, money and energy providing growth opportunities for your team?

These are the most common excuses:

  • I really want to, but my team is too busy with their day-to-day work.
  • Our training budget was sucked up by operational costs.
  • Oh, and did I mention how busy I am?

Lack of time is the worst excuse imaginable when your employees are looking to grow. Not defending your training budget to the leaders above you is a close second. Consider that there will be much less time to spend on employee development when people start leaving for other opportunities. Take their development seriously now or regret it later.

Finding growth opportunities for your people doesn’t have to be costly, and the outcomes can be of tremendous value to your business. But remember, your employees are unique. Developing their skills can’t be a one-size-fits-all approach.

Word to the wise: as their coach, keep your needs out of it. Their growth should not be about making you look good (more on that later). Take the time to learn about their strengths, weaknesses, dreams, desires and passions.

The simple truth about coaching is that it doesn’t have to be fancy, but it does need to be consistent. If you’re not already, incorporate career growth discussions into your regular one-on-one meetings with your direct reports. Once you know what makes them tick, you can sync up their aspirations with projects that will give them a chance to shine.

Side benefit? Even though you did it for them, it’s good for you. Your reputation as a leader will soar, as will your team’s.

Side effect? You may realize that your manager needs to give your career aspirations some love and attention. A new Gallup poll shows that only 35 percent of managers are engaged. Ask for what you need. You deserve it.

3. Motivate your stars – and your understudies

Keeping your lead players passionate used to entail putting them in the “upper L” of your nine-box grid at year’s end for the 6 percent raise versus the 4 percent everyone else is getting. (I’m bored just thinking about it.) With many HR departments trending away from traditional performance evaluations, it’s time to start looking for creative ways to reward key talent.

What about a high-potential program, you ask? Not all are created equally. Proceed with caution.

Shoehorning your stars into a program that rests upon a narrow or vague definition of potential is nearly played out. Just as HIPO programs are walking hand in hand into the sunset with annual evaluations, the Harvard Business Review is marching in like the cavalry with a cover story titled “Let Your Workers Rebel.” The premise: encourage your best people to break the rules and watch their potential transform. Francesca Gino, Harvard professor and author of the story, asks us to look deeply at our inner rebel. These innovative approaches are the future of star talent retention.

And finally, what about your low performers? Is it really all their fault? If you haven’t already exhausted their development possibilities, consider applying steps one and two as an experiment before you throw in the towel.

Above all, don’t ignore the problem. Great coaches don’t allow issues to fester. And they always take accountability.

While we’re on the topic, I’ll leave you with this insight on coaching from Yogi Berra: “It ain’t the heat, it’s the humility.”

 

 

Here’s How Your Law Firm Can Master Social Media Listening

 

Social media listening for law firms (also known as social listening) is a strategy that involves monitoring the social media landscape to see what people are saying about your firm, your competitors and your niche in general.

Given the usefulness of social listening, you’d think that more law firms with an active social media presence would integrate it into their digital marketing campaigns. But as it turns out, it’s a technique that’s often overlooked by many organizations, both inside and outside the legal services industry.

Why social listening is important

Shaping your law firm’s business strategy without engaging in social media listening is tantamount to setting yourself up to fail. Insights are why social listening is important. If you’re not listening to what people are saying about you and your industry, how can you give them what they want?

Monitoring social mentions will help track what your target audience likes and doesn’t like, providing valuable insights to help your firm grow. Simply put, social listening is about monitoring what people are saying about you, your competitors and your industry. The information you find can then be leveraged into your content strategy.

How to start

Although many marketers will tell you that you need tools to ensure the effectiveness of your listening strategy, the real trick behind social listening is understanding what you should be listening to.

For starters, you should identify exact keywords and topics to monitor. These include:

  • Your law firm’s name and name used in social media
  • Names of your services
  • Competitor names
  • Industry terms relevant to your firm
  • Slogan/catchphrase
  • Names of key people in your firm
  • Branded hashtags
  • Generic hashtags relevant to your niche

Once you have a good idea of what keywords you should be tracking on social media, you can then proceed with these social media listening steps.

Step 1 – Examine where people are talking about you.

Aside from monitoring what your target audience is saying about you and your industry, it’s important to know where the chatter is. In this social media listening step, you want to cast as wide a net as possible, going beyond LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter to check places like FindLaw, Avvo, or Justia. You may be surprised to discover the conversations happening in these places that you previously had no idea about.

Understanding where people are talking about your firm and industry lets you create the appropriate strategy to join the conversation.

For example, with the information you discovered through social listening, you can leverage aggregator sites like FindLaw, Avvo, and Justia to improve your visibility and reach. This might be a more cost-effective strategy compared to fighting their rankings on Google.

Step 2 – Get a pulse on your competition.

While you should never copy a competitor’s strategy, you can gain valuable insights from their social media activities by looking into what your shared audience thinks. In other words, this social media listening step is about looking at the mistakes competing firms are making so you can avoid them in your social media marketing campaign.

Of course, you should also look at what they’re doing right and draw inspiration from there. But more often than not, it’s much easier to track their missteps and incorporate the lessons learned into your firm’s body of knowledge.

Step 3 – Get the entire firm involved.

This social media listening step is vital, because your listening activities will yield information that won’t just help your firm’s marketing team but will also help improve your legal team’s relationship with clients, both new and existing, and even your ability to recruit new talent.

Be sure to share your social listening insights with the rest of your firm’s relevant teams. Be sure to get their inputs, too. You never know what nugget of information will improve your firm’s services, reputation and brand.

Editor’s Note: Looking for an online marketing service? We can help you choose the one that’s right for you. Use the questionnaire below to have our sister site, BuyerZone, provide you with information from a variety of vendors for free:

Putting it all together

The value of social listening as a research tool is just one of many reasons why law firms should recognize the importance of social media. Aside from aiding marketing, social listening activities can be used to develop faster and better recruitment processes, and even improve your relationship with other firms. If you’re not sure where to start, you can work with a digital marketing agency that specializes in developing custom marketing solutions for law firms and attorneys.

Be sure to act on the information you find. Social listening is only useful if you’re using the insights you gleaned to make your firm better.

 

Mariah Carey, Security Guard Claims Sexual Harassment, Says She Also Called Him Nazi, Skinhead

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‘All My Children’ Star Shane McDermott Busted for Drunk in Public

Video Profits Unleashed

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7 Signs It’s Time to Find a New Job

 

It happens to all of us at one time or another: You find that you dread Monday mornings, you can’t stand the thought of being behind your desk for another five days and are living for long holidays and weekends.

These can be natural reactions to the workplace (wouldn’t we all like to be wilderness bloggers or Instagram famous?) but other times, these feelings can belie a more existential problem with your work life.

In this article, I identify seven of the more common problems employees face that perhaps should spur the consideration of a change of workplace. I’m not advocating that you tender your resignation if these all apply to you, but they should certainly begin a conversation!

1. Your employer doesn’t take pride in your accomplishments

When you finally crack that code or reel in a big fish, do you find that you’re not getting much fanfare for your achievements?

This isn’t an uncommon experience. In fact, one of the top reasons Americans leave their jobs is lack of recognition and 65 percent of people surveyed responded that they got no recognition at all from their job.

This isn’t always a personal problem. You might not be the only one going underappreciated. It could be an “environmental” problem, in which case, it’s probably a good idea to leave anyhow.

2. The work no longer challenges you

Are you bored throughout the day? Do you feel like you’re just going through the motions until the clock strikes five?

If you feel like your job isn’t challenging anymore, and you’re not seeing any possibility for change or advancement, then hit the road. There’s an old saying: “If you’re the smartest guy in the room, find another room.” The same can be said about your job. If the job isn’t challenging, find one that is.

3. No room to grow

One of the worst things that can happen in a job is hitting that ceiling, pushing against it, but realizing there’s no more room to grow.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a specific workplace problem but one that is affecting America as a whole. According to a recent report, 92 percent of children born in 1940 earned more than their parents, but only half of those born in 1984 can say the same. This is a disheartening fact but not one that can’t be challenged.

You should feel confident shopping around and seeing whether there are available jobs that are above your current pay grade. There’s nothing worse than feeling stagnant financially, especially for younger people with new families who are often the most affected.

4. No chance to innovate

When work isn’t challenging, that’s one thing, but when you’re actively suppressing your innovative urges, that can signal a bigger problem.

Are you a pioneering problem-solver who’s being forced to play by the book? Don’t settle for just bumping along blindly at your job or not speaking up for fear of rocking the boat. Instead, either force your employer to let you spread your wings a little or get moving.

5. You find yourself complaining often

When you get home from work, do you sit around the dinner table with your spouse and family and instead of light, buoyant conversation, you find that you’re just complaining about work?

Do you go out with your friends and dominate the conversation with your grievances?

This can be a big issue and not just with your work life but your social life and personal mental health as well. While it’s been shown that you can improve your mental health through complaining, staying in a bad situation isn’t recommended for anyone.

6. You’re miserable at work

Sure, after the weekend we all have a little bit of dread about going into work on Monday morning, and by Thursday, we’re all ready for the weekend. But there’s a difference between a “case of the Mondays” and full-scale abhorrence of going to and being at work.

Of course, there could be a personal problem you’re dealing with at your job, but, more often than not, it’s because you’re unsatisfied with your current position. See what you can do to remedy it or get out of dodge.

7. Your performance is suffering

While some continue to excel despite dissatisfaction with their job, others find that their performance starts to suffer.

You might find yourself in the boss’s office if your performance takes a marked dip, but this can actually be a good thing. You might be able to speak with your superior, or an HR professional, about what’s going wrong and how it can be fixed.

While there are plenty of reasons to seek out a new job, there can be many reasons to stay put. A good salary, health benefits and other perks might outweigh your lack of challenging work or inhibited innovation. In these cases, I would suggest speaking with someone higher up to troubleshoot ways to make your job more to your liking. In the end, it’s going to be more beneficial for the company to keep a good employee happy than to let them walk away.

 

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Video Profits Unleashed

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Local Online Marketing – Video – Internet Advertising – SEO

 

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Here’s How Your Law Firm Can Master Social Media Listening

 

Social media listening for law firms (also known as social listening) is a strategy that involves monitoring the social media landscape to see what people are saying about your firm, your competitors and your niche in general.

Given the usefulness of social listening, you’d think that more law firms with an active social media presence would integrate it into their digital marketing campaigns. But as it turns out, it’s a technique that’s often overlooked by many organizations, both inside and outside the legal services industry.

Why social listening is important

Shaping your law firm’s business strategy without engaging in social media listening is tantamount to setting yourself up to fail. Insights are why social listening is important. If you’re not listening to what people are saying about you and your industry, how can you give them what they want?

Monitoring social mentions will help track what your target audience likes and doesn’t like, providing valuable insights to help your firm grow. Simply put, social listening is about monitoring what people are saying about you, your competitors and your industry. The information you find can then be leveraged into your content strategy.

How to start

Although many marketers will tell you that you need tools to ensure the effectiveness of your listening strategy, the real trick behind social listening is understanding what you should be listening to.

For starters, you should identify exact keywords and topics to monitor. These include:

  • Your law firm’s name and name used in social media
  • Names of your services
  • Competitor names
  • Industry terms relevant to your firm
  • Slogan/catchphrase
  • Names of key people in your firm
  • Branded hashtags
  • Generic hashtags relevant to your niche

Once you have a good idea of what keywords you should be tracking on social media, you can then proceed with these social media listening steps.

Step 1 – Examine where people are talking about you.

Aside from monitoring what your target audience is saying about you and your industry, it’s important to know where the chatter is. In this social media listening step, you want to cast as wide a net as possible, going beyond LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter to check places like FindLaw, Avvo, or Justia. You may be surprised to discover the conversations happening in these places that you previously had no idea about.

Understanding where people are talking about your firm and industry lets you create the appropriate strategy to join the conversation.

For example, with the information you discovered through social listening, you can leverage aggregator sites like FindLaw, Avvo, and Justia to improve your visibility and reach. This might be a more cost-effective strategy compared to fighting their rankings on Google.

Step 2 – Get a pulse on your competition.

While you should never copy a competitor’s strategy, you can gain valuable insights from their social media activities by looking into what your shared audience thinks. In other words, this social media listening step is about looking at the mistakes competing firms are making so you can avoid them in your social media marketing campaign.

Of course, you should also look at what they’re doing right and draw inspiration from there. But more often than not, it’s much easier to track their missteps and incorporate the lessons learned into your firm’s body of knowledge.

Step 3 – Get the entire firm involved.

This social media listening step is vital, because your listening activities will yield information that won’t just help your firm’s marketing team but will also help improve your legal team’s relationship with clients, both new and existing, and even your ability to recruit new talent.

Be sure to share your social listening insights with the rest of your firm’s relevant teams. Be sure to get their inputs, too. You never know what nugget of information will improve your firm’s services, reputation and brand.

Editor’s Note: Looking for an online marketing service? We can help you choose the one that’s right for you. Use the questionnaire below to have our sister site, BuyerZone, provide you with information from a variety of vendors for free:

Putting it all together

The value of social listening as a research tool is just one of many reasons why law firms should recognize the importance of social media. Aside from aiding marketing, social listening activities can be used to develop faster and better recruitment processes, and even improve your relationship with other firms. If you’re not sure where to start, you can work with a digital marketing agency that specializes in developing custom marketing solutions for law firms and attorneys.

Be sure to act on the information you find. Social listening is only useful if you’re using the insights you gleaned to make your firm better.

 

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How to Learn from Dark Data Lurking in Your Small Business

 

Is Your Small Business Hiding Dark Data?

It’s time to bring the data in your company out of the dark.

Yep — out of the dark.  At this very moment, most of your data is languishing in various systems.  It’s in your accounting system, your CRM system, your ERP system, it’s in your social media accounts, and it’s even in spreadsheets and other documents.

All this data represents a large pool that can help you capture opportunities faster and more profitably than anyone else in your marketplace.

What Exactly Is Dark Data?

Dark data is simply any information that has been generated and captured somewhere in your company and then hasn’t been used.

Once you begin looking, it’s easy to find dark data almost anywhere in your company.  A few examples are:

  • Details of past transactions with purchasers who are not currently active customers;
  • Different versions of quotes and proposals that have been prepared while negotiating a final sale;
  • How long it took customers to pay past invoices;
  • The number of specific activities different team members have done (i.e. number of sales meetings, etc);
  • Sales of each product for each customer;
  • Geographic details of active customers.

Once you get on a roll, the list can grow quite long quite quickly.

Why Does It Matter?

Your dark data matters because it contains the DNA of the current version of your company’s performance.

Whatever performance you are currently getting and whatever performance has been created in the past is clearly explained by taking a dive into your dark data.

This makes it tremendously valuable in managing your performance no matter what your competitors or the economy does.

Dark data gives you a “time machine” to determine the causes of performance in a particular previous period.  This allows you to compare performance across various time periods and understand the reasons that performance varied.

How Do You Find Your Dark Data?

Leveraging your dark data can provide you with some amazing upsides.

However, many companies seem to struggle to identify it in an effective and useful way.

The good news is that it doesn’t have to be difficult — if you use a structured approach.

A very effective way to find it is to follow a two-step approach applied to the key dimensions of your business — customers, products and services, and your team.

Here is a simple two-step approach:

Step 1

Draw a cycle map that identifies EVERY step in your particular cycle.  For example, for your customers, this would be each step from first being identified as a prospect through to being converted into a sale, and then onto a repeat customer or churn customer.

Step 2

Once you have drawn your cycle map, identify all the types of information that are generated at each step of the cycle.  Don’t allow yourself to get constrained by what you typically report on in your company.

For example, a data point that would be captured upon invoicing would likely be zip code although you may not generally run reports of zip codes in your company.

A great way to do this is to create a table that summarizes the information.

What to Do with Your Dark Data

Once you’ve got your dark data identified and summarized it’s time to use the information.

For each data point you identified, brainstorm ways it could be used to gain insight into another dimension of your company (i.e. customers, products, services, people).  Admittedly this part of your dark data journey can be a little bit challenging.

It is a great idea to utilize your team to do a thought experiment that answers the following questions.

  1. What would happen to performance if this data point doubled?
  2. What would happen if this data point was halved?
  3. What does this data source tell us, or imply to us, about various areas of our company?
  4. What could this data source tell us about various areas of our company?
  5. What could the information contained in this data source tell us about our untapped potential?

Take Action

With the answers to your questions in hand, select between one and three action steps you could take to capitalize on your insights.

Focus on a small number of action steps.

Don’t pick more than you can execute on.  Picking one and executing it vigorously is infinitely better than having several going with no progress.

So get started bringing your data out of the dark.

Data Management Platform Photo via Shutterstock

This article, “How to Learn from Dark Data Lurking in Your Small Business” was first published on Small Business Trends

The 5 Biggest Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

 

Are you making these mistakes without realizing?

 

3 Ways to Be a Stronger Influencer in Business

 

Scottish novelist Robert Louis Stevenson coined the phrase “everyone lives by selling something.” While some of us dedicate our careers to sales specifically, all professionals are required to engage in influencing actions as their work calls for it. Sometimes we have to sell people on our ideas. Sometimes we have to get stakeholder buy-in to progress a certain project. We may not all go door to door speaking with potential customers, but we all navigate our professional environments using our individual influencing abilities in some capacity.

In my 25-year career in sales and professional services, I can attest to two things: Successful influencing doesn’t look like influencing at all, and the best influencing doesn’t always come from where you’d expect it. Some of the best influencing I’ve witnessed has not come from executive teams or sales directors, but rather the individual contributors throughout all levels of an organization who know and show who they are, and authentically build relationships rooted in creating mutually positive outcomes.

This dynamic is especially relevant in today’s business landscape as organizations become less hierarchical – but if the best influencing is virtually invisible, how can we learn to do it, and how can we teach others to do it? Below are the three areas I believe can help build a foundation for successful influencing interactions.

1. Mindset

A common misconception in influencing is that our goal is to get someone to see things our way. In reality, no one can be a successful influencer while vying to get others to think they are right. Rather, you have to come to all interactions with the mindset of identifying a winning outcome for all parties. When we veer away from this mentality, we can easily be perceived as trying to manipulate a situation in our own favor. Instead, we must prepare to influence through a spirit of partnership by establishing mutual trust and understanding. The best influencers go into conversations seeking to understand the other person’s point of view and use well-chosen, open-ended questions as a way to respect this period of inquiry.

2. Capability

A critical component in successful influencing is tied to our ability to identify the real issues and engage in dialogue about possible solutions. Sometimes these solutions can be found through partnership with one another. Sometimes they can’t, and when they can’t, it’s important that we don’t try to fit a square peg solution into a round hole problem. It will be obvious if you’ve done this because the introduction of the proposed solution won’t change the status of the original problem. The stakes for doing this part wrong can be hard to come back from, because you’ll have wasted their time (and yours) and the relationship will suffer because of it. Here, your “talk” is only as strong as your “listen.”

3. Behavior

Lastly, our ability to influence rests on being able to engender positive interactions that are on the customers’ terms. Choosing a selling or influencing style should not depend on your own interpersonal preferences, but on the behavioral style of the other person. Successful influencers are able to translate observations of their customers’ body language, verbal style and work environment into actionable insight that they use to guide their interactions. By adapting their style to their customers’ style, influencers can mirror the behavior their customer finds most comfortable, ensuring the message isn’t brought down by the wrong delivery. Self-awareness development tools, like Insights Discovery, which evaluates psychometric data and leverages personality principles, can be very helpful resources to learn more about yourself and how your behavior is perceived by those around you.

Positional power and leadership authority yield a certain influencing heft, but leveraging the art of influence can benefit anyone’s role in an organization, regardless of where they sit in the org chart. When you treat your stakeholders’ agenda as your own and combine that with a solution mindset and interpersonal mastery, the conversations flow, the relationships solidify, and the actual act of influencing is all but an afterthought.